Monday, October 05, 2009

KFXM October 3, 1969

Suspicious Minds-Elvis Presley #1
Highest debut Ball Of Fire-Tommy James & The Shondells #28 New
Hot Fun In The Summertime-Sly & The Family Stone
I'll Blow You A Kiss In The Wind-Boyce & Hart

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Way back in 1968 or 1969 I stopped by American Physical Fitness on Valley Blvd in Bloomington and got myself an Exer-Genie. Somewhere along the line I also got the Charles Atlas mail-order bodybuilding lessons. I think they're all in a box in my garage now. They did wonders for me. Instead of being a scrawny weakling I'm a fat slob.

Lord Darth Sidious said...

how many others of that period also "benefited" from sending in their hard-earned dollars for those Charles Atlas booklets which promised recipients they could end up "looking like Hercules in no time at all"? Poor guys who did so usually got beat-up by bullies regardless!

Anonymous said...

SUSPICIOUS MINDS # 1 again?
One of the great classics.

Never did understand why there's
a false fade near the end.
Had to be intentional. They coulda
fixed it. Odd thing about this
false fade on the radio is that
limiters immediately go to work
and bring the level to near-normal
and there goes the effect of a
false fade. Well, almost.

Funny line about this song
I heard by Chris Compton of KFXM-FM.
He said: "..this song was recorded
in a moving van studio. They were
moving through a bridge tunnel...."

Not hilarious but it's a thought
joke. AM radio....bridges..fades.
You all know!!

Lord Darth Sidious said...

the REASON for that "false fade" towards the latter part of Elvis Presley's "Suspicious Minds" is a matter of record (no pun intended):
recall that by the Fall of 1969, the King had clearly re-established his primacy as a headlining entertainer in Las Vegas and concert venues around the country. Col. Tom Parker, Elvis' manager, who brought his client back to prominence with his new look and a clearly different attitude and direction, shrewdly helped to engineer that "false fade" on what everyone knew at the time would turn out to be a runaway smash Number One pop record hit single; and so, at the Colonel's behest, what seemed like a premature fade-out and fading back in of the song was actually designed as an audio version of an "E-N-C-O-R-E"...
yes, "Elvis is Back" was the message behind that encore inserted into the final mixing by RCA Records of "Suspicious Minds" and the rest, as they say, was history.

Anonymous said...

I'll take that explanation with
a grain of salt.

Lord Darth Sidious said...

ahso! must also take YOUR "explantion with [that same] grain of salt"...

(like Sgt. Joe Friday once said, "Just the facts, Sir, just the facts."

Harley Davidson said...

Didn't Samantha Stephens' cousin Serena write "I'm Gonna Blow You A Kiss In The Wind"? I remember hearing that on TV.

Anonymous said...

I didn't have an explanation
for the false fade. I said
I never knew why. I only offered
a humorous explanation.
Didn't intend for that to
be taken seriously. I credited
Chris Compton for the "explanation".

Lord Darth Sidious said...

to Anonymous: but, of course!
that is why in the same context
this One posted his own non-"humourous explanation", and it was NOT due to your crediting of Mr. Compton's for the first- posted "'explanation'".
FRY: as a scholar and researcher,
my contributions to this website are for the intention of historical discourse as much as possible. as stated earlier, "Just the facts, Sir..."